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If your dog's breed has a history of canine heart disease, it's important to talk to your veterinarian about preventative care, and to learn to recognize early signs and symptoms. Don't know if your dog is on the at-risk list? Here are 14 breeds that have an unfortunate history of canine heart disease:
2. Great Dane: The Great Dane has been nicknamed "the heartbreak breed" because of its link to Canine Heart Disease. The Great Dane Club of America provides a lot of good information about Great Danes and heart disease.
3. German Shepherd: German Shepherds can suffer from Cardiomyopathy, as well as abnormalities in the mitral valve.
4. Doberman Pinscher: Nearly 40% of Dilated Cardiomyopathy diagnoses, a condition in which the heart becomes enlarged and has trouble pumping blood, are for Doberman Pinschers.
5. Boxer: Boxers are prone to a heart condition called Cardiomyopathy, as well as other congenital heart conditions.
6. Irish Wolfhound: Dilated Cardiomyopathy is common in deep-chested dogs and is one of the leading causes of death for Irish Wolfhounds.
7. Scottish Deerhound: Similar to the Irish Wolfhound, the Scottish Deerhound is also prone to Dilated Cardiomyopathy.
8. Labrador Retriever: Labradors are prone to obesity which is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Understanding how obesity contributes to heart disease is an important first step in preventative care for your dog.
9. Newfoundland: Aortic/Subaortic Stenosis, a genetic disorder involving defective heart valves, is a common heart defect in Newfoundlands, and the second most common congenital heart defect in dogs.
10. Golden Retriever: Like the Newfoundland, Golden Retrievers are one of the many breeds prone to Aortic/Subaortic Stenosis.
11. St. Bernard: St. Bernards are prone to Dilated Cardiomyopathy, a heart disease characterized by the enlargement of the heart.
12. Bullmastiff: Bullmastiffs are prone to Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Aortic/Subaortic Stenosis, two major forms of canine heart disease.
13. Bernese Mountain Dog: Aortic/Subaortic Stenosis is hereditary in some breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs.
14. Rottweilers: Aortic/Subaortic Stenosis is the most common form of canine heart disease seen in Rottweilers
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14 Breeds Who Need To Watch Out For Health Risks To Their Heart

If your dog’s breed has a history of canine heart disease, it’s important to talk to your veterinarian about preventative care, and to learn to recognize early signs and symptoms.

Don’t know if your dog is on the at-risk list? Here are 14 breeds that have an unfortunate history of canine heart disease:

Sources: Cavalier King Charles SpanielsBernese Mountain Dog Club Of America, idexx, A Love Of Rottweilers, PetMD

Featured Image via Matt Biddulph/ Flickr

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