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14 Wildflowers Fields That Will Make You and Your Dog Want To Run Free

14 Wildflowers Fields That Will Make You and Your Dog Want To Run Free

Paris Permenter, along with her husband, John Bigley, is the co-author of Texas with Dogs and the founder of PawZaar.com.

What’s red, white, and blue–not to mention yellow, orange, and purple? Spring wildflowers, of course! These fragrant fields make the perfect photo backdrop for your pooch—and a great way to get in a dog walk you’ll never forget. We never miss a chance to get a photo of our Irie and Tiki in the flowers!

1. Yellowstone National Park

Dogs are restricted to the developed portions of this park (including Old Faithful) where you’ll still find some beautiful wildflowers that make great photos with Fido. But keep a watchful eye: the bulbs of the spring beauty and glacier lily are favorite snacks of the grizzly bear!

2. Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Borrego Springs, California

What’s that: you don’t picture wildflowers when you hear desert? Think again! Instead of tulips, you and Fido can tiptoe through the blooming prickly poppies and blooming cacti at this park located two hours east of San Diego.

A photo posted by Amy_Zangerle (@amy_zangerle) on

3. San Diego, California

This extremely dog-friendly city is blooming with great wildflower walks that welcome woofers.

4. Table Mountain, Oroville, California

This northern California park has great views of the Golden Valley and a patchwork of colorful blooms that make a great photo.

A photo posted by Finn (@finnstagram1212) on

5. Manchester Preserve, Encinitas, California

Miles of trails wind through coastal scrub which blooms with color—and welcomes canines.

A photo posted by @a_boonedog on

6. Ennis, Texas

This north Texas town has been named both the Official Bluebonnet City and Official Bluebonnet Trail of Texas.

A photo posted by @kenedylorae on

7. Chappell Hill, Texas

Located between Houston and Austin, this town hosts the Official State of Texas Bluebonnet Festival—but your dog can pose in fields of the state flower of Texas from mid-March through mid-April.

A photo posted by Jonney (@jonney_moon) on

8. Highland Lakes Bluebonnet Trail, Texas

This self-drive trail winds through the Texas Hill Country and is ground zero for the obligatory Texas roadside photo: you and your dogs, squatting in the state flowers.

Paris and dogs in bluebonnets

9. Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina

America’s largest home makes a grand place for a dog walk!

Biltmore Estate wildflowers

10. Gatlinburg Trail, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is called the “Wildflower National Park” thanks to its 1,500 varieties—but only a few trails are open to four-legged visitors. Fortunately the Gatlinburg Trail is one of them, a great place for you and your dog to hike and spot lady slipper orchids, violets and bee-balms.

11. Crested Butte, Colorado

Nicknamed the “Wildflower Capital of Colorado,” Crested Butte’s wildflower season peaks in late spring and summer with blooms ranging from sunflowers to dark-blue lupines. Dogs aren’t permitted at the wildflower festival but no worries; stop by the Crested Butte Chamber of Commerce to get info on dog-friendly hiking destinations throughout the season.

12. Linden, Texas

The hometown of Don Henley is also home to the annual Wildflower Trails Festival, complete with a pet parade.

Irie in wildflowers

13. Piedmont Park, Atlanta, Georgia

Dogs and dogwood—now what could be a better match? Flowering dogwood fills Piedmont Park, so much so that the park hosts the annual Dogwood Festival. The massive event’s not dog-friendly but you and your dog can visit the park any other time (and even take in the dog park!)

A photo posted by Artist In the City (@cbcinked) on

14. A field near you

Hey, you don’t have to plan a roadtrip to take advantage of the spring blooms. Grab your canine and your camera and head to a field near you!

A photo posted by RiotDemon (@riotdemon) on

P.S. Just Don’t Eat the Flowers!

A photo posted by Amy Bush (@amycbush) on

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